DISPELLING THE MYTH OF THE WILD AND CRAZY ARABIAN HORSE! 
by Diane Jones

Windt im Wald Farm
Crabbet-bred Arabian and Arabian-Pinto Horses
Auburn Township, Ohio 44023
www.wiwfarm.com
Joey Bruno & Supreme TsamazOn April 24, 2004, my husband Tom and I were proud to serve as ambassadors of the Arabian breed as we participated in the first Thompson FarmFest, held from 10-4 in Thompson Township, Geauga County, Ohio. Tired of constantly being reminded by experienced and inexperienced horsemen, alike, that any horse with an ounce of Arabian blood has to be wild, dangerous, and crazy, we set out to demonstrate that Arabians are calm, trusting and trustworthy family horses.

We set ourselves up in a round pen located at Ledgemont High School with inexpensive home-made props: cavalletti made from PVC pipe, 2 vertical poles with concrete bases that we constructed from more PVC pipe, a 10' X10' plastic tarp that rustled and curled with the slightest breeze, a beat-up plastic wading pool that made plenty of noise when one of us or one of the horses stepped on it, and a loading whip with a white plastic grocery bag tied to its end. From a card table covered with a white cloth bearing our farm logo, we gave away promotional material from AHA, including Arabian horse pictures for kids to color, and our own farm flyer, which included a brief history about us and a drawing I had made of one of our Pinto-Arabian horses. Next to the drawing was the same horse in the same pose in a color photograph so that the kids would have a key to the colors they should use to complete the picture.

As both children and adults approached, we gave our demonstration with the aid of Supreme Tsamaz(HU Sohda Nohta x Supreme Tsolitaire x Supreme Tsultan), our registered 3/4 Arabian mare, and WIW Royal Windsong (Royal Pride Rythm x Cameo Windchime x Woodwind V), our purebred yearling filly. We started the demonstration by trotting Windsong at the end of a show lead whose chain never made contact with her jaw or nose, and then setting her up to do a halter stance just by turning to face her without the use of any whip. Once she was in position we ran the whip with the plastic bag across every part of her body, including her face, and she did not flinch. Our point was to prove that Arabian horses are not afraid of sudden noises or whips. Windsong also walked calmly over the cavalletti, the plastic tarp, and across the swimming pool. We allowed children to lead her around.

Then came Supreme Tsamaz's turn. Under saddle and using only a bosal with web reins clipped to the center back of the bosal (no bit), she walked calmly over and bent around the cavalletti, walked over the tarp as the wind picked it up, and walked inside the wading pool. Her riders included Tom, me, a five-year old and several middle-aged folks. Everyone showed obvious delight in being able to be successful with horses with no previous horse-training skills.

Later in the morning I rode Supreme Tsamaz and Tom led Windsong along Thompson's main street from Ledgement High School to Thompson's main square, where vendors and visitors alike were congregated. I waved from horseback while motorcyclists came within eight feet of us. Windsong, likewise, walked along the edge of a long, deep, open ditch, ignored oncoming cars, trucks, and motorcycles and braved a parking lot full of brand new, shiny Ford truck grills without even a misstep or a flinch.

After we reached the square, we greeted visitors and vendors, gave away more promotional material, let some of the vendors ride Supreme Tsamaz, put more kids on Supreme Tsamaz's back, and let Windsong make friends with dogs, rabbits, and goats. We were crowded with visitors who volunteered how enchanted they were with our beautiful, GENTLE horses. Jo Ann Rokosky, one of the directors of the Thompson FarmFest, and an avowed Quarter Horse fan, announced from the microphone, "Tom and Diane Jones, from Windt im Wald Farm, are here with their beautiful Arabian horses. Arabian horses have often been stereotyped as wild and flighty, but Tom and Diane are showing us otherwise."

We had a wonderful time at the Thompson FarmFest. We trust that there are now many more folks who can give testimonials about the loyalty and quiet good sense of the Arabian and Half-Arabian horse. We look forward to being on hand for next year's FarmFest with our Arabian horses. Sincere thanks to the staff of AHA, who worked feverishly to make certain that we would have the promotional materials to hand out at FarmFest. Please know, AHA, that while our Arabian horses did most of the promoting, we could not have pulled it off without your prompt 
assistance.

Sincerely,
Diane and Tom Jones
Windt im Wald Farm Arabians and Pintos
Auburn Township, Ohio 44023
www.wiwfarm.com

Below are photos from FarmFest.  Please Click on the more info link
under each photo to for a description and to enlarge the photo 

 | Top |


EQUINE
ARTICLES

DISPELLING THE MYTH
HORSE ADDICTION
MONROE COUNTY  SHERIFF'S MOUNTED UNIT


THOMPSON, OHIO FARMFEST

The first annual Thompson, Ohio, FarmFest was held on April 24, 2004


 


btmlst

| NEWS | | ABOUT US | | BREEDS | | CALENDAR | | CLUBS | | SHOWS | | CLASSIFIEDS | | DRESSAGE |

| ART/BOOKS | | JUDGES | | PETER CAMERON | | ASK THE JUDGE | | ARTICLES | | RESCUE | | STOLEN HORSES

| INTERVIEWS | | MEMORIALS | | EQ HEALTH | | COLOSTRUM | | RIVENDELL | | PHOTOGRAPHY | | SHOW REVIEWS |

| Privacy Policy | | Terms of Use | | Contact Form |


Copyright 1999-2012 Equine Extra All Rights Reserved

Website designed, maintained and hosted by WSDA Design Group